We print your photos using top-of-the-line printers and papers, our current workhorses being the Canon Pro-4000S and Epson SureColor P9000.

These printers use archival pigmented inks that are guaranteed to not fade for a century.

We regularly calibrate our printers and monitors to ensure that the colors and tones in your image files match the results on paper.

Please note that the final print may look different than what you are seeing on your screen. 

This is because most people do not have color-calibrated monitors, and you will experience a range of color saturation and tone based on the type of monitor you have as well as the screen brightness settings.

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The file type you provide and the color profile attached to the file can also be a factor. 

For fine art prints, when working in Photoshop or a similar program you should always attach a color profile to the files, which tells the printer what you intended for the image and how it should be print. We recommend outputting your images in the Adobe (1998) RGB color space. 

Our printers will automatically look for the right ICC profile based on your image and the paper type, but if your file was created in CMYK or does not have a color profile assigned, it may print with additional saturation and look different from what you see on screen.

Here is more info on color profiles from Adobe, and if you'd like to learn more about how we handle the files you upload you can refer to this blog post.

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One final note: We have several quality control steps built into our printing process. However, because we are dealing with fine art materials, they may infrequently contain very small flaws such as a tiny white dot on the image, or tiny mark that may have been embedded in the paper prior to printing. 

If your photo arrives with a major issue or defect, please contact us immediately. 

For minor flaws such as the ones described above that are inherent to the creation of hand made, fine art products, and ones that are only visible upon very close inspection or with a magnifying glass, we cannot offer reprints at our expense. To keep our printing prices reasonable, can't justify the environmental cost of throwing away good prints with the smallest of imperfections. 

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